This Australian Guy Would Do Literally Anything To Make It "Big in Japan" | AsianCrush
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This Australian Guy Would Do Literally Anything To Make It “Big in Japan”

Otter Lee December 26, 2017 December 26th, 2017

Meet David Elliot-Jones, the Australian expat who has big dreams of making it big time in Japan. In his most recent stunt, Jones  took to the streets, stripped down to a thong, and wore a headdress shaped like a rice ball. Dubbing himself “Onigiri Man,” he stood out as a brazen presence in bustling Tokyo.

Jones’ other deliberate, carefully calculated ploys for attention included being completely naked with a bunch of plush toys guarding his manhood and embracing his supernerd alter ego “Dr. Jones,” who like any pervy or obsessive character in anime, is rocking the sexually-triggered nosebleed.

Jones became fascinated with the idea of fame in Japan after stumbling on a treasure trove of odd characters and pseudo celebrities on the Internet. He determined that there are entire individuals who are viral sensations solely in Japan, and that as a quirky caucasian foreigner, he would have a better chance at finding fame and fortune out there.

Besides putting himself out there in ways that are probably completely mortifying to Japan’s society of manners, Jones has taken lessons to learn the language and enlisted both professional videographers and talent agents to help make him more marketable–or in this case, more memorable.

Jones was told to embrace his geeky look by his professional team, recalling, “We found that it was quite easy because I had a particular look, I looked quite nerdy. Once we cottoned on to that we ran with it a bit and made me into a super nerd.”

Early into 2018, a documentary on Jones’  experiences titled “Big In Japan” will release. While Jones DOES want to be famous, he’s also using his adventures as a means to study the elusive quality of fame in general.

He says, “With fame we tend to look at it as either something we want or we don’t want. But we found it was a lot more nuanced than that, and it’s an extension of something quite human.”

Watch the trailer for the doc:

Via NextShark