Spy Cam Porn Is Causing Korean Women To Fear Public Restrooms | AsianCrush
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Spy Cam Porn Is Causing Korean Women To Fear Public Restrooms

Otter Lee August 6, 2018 August 6th, 2018

Using a public toilet shouldn’t be a daunting task that compromises your privacy, but in South Korea, hidden cameras meant to record women for pornographic usage remain a major, growing problem. Every year, over 6,000 “spy porn” crimes are reported nationally. Many don’t go reported by people who fear they will be identified or suffer consequences.

Locker rooms in gyms and pools, public restrooms, and dressing rooms in clothing stores are all hotspots for such illegal activity. Perhaps worst of all, several perpetrators are in fact familiar people and acquaintances to the victims.

While most smut sites upload and circulate videos of women (80% of all cases), a fair amount of men too can expect to have their nudity put on display. It’s became such a rampant issue that many women feel the need to check every public restroom they use for cameras before using it.

Sometimes, the spy porn crimes are committed outside in public. A woman named Kim described the horrific experience of catching a man shooting up her skirt while she tried to dine in a restaurant. After she confronted and stopped the perverted behavior, she found out she was the subject of a sex chatroom.

Recalling the experience of reporting her crime, the woman, who only wanted to be identified by the surname Kim, said: “I kept thinking, what would other people think? Will the police officer think that my clothes were too revealing? That I look cheap? In the police station, I felt lonely. I felt all the men were looking at me as if I was a piece of meat or a sexual object. I felt frightened.I didn’t tell anyone [at home]. I was afraid of being blamed. I was afraid my family, friends and people around me would look at me as these men looked at me.”

Despite the clear evidence and her efforts to report the sex crime, Kim’s sexual offender never went punished. She was put through a process that humiliated and demoralized her.

Korean porn site Soranet thrived on illegally recorded videos and revenge porn with millions of users. Many of the women featured in its database videos were so ashamed that they took their own lives. It took three years to bring down the company, and for many, the damage was already been done. Authorities find it especially difficult to stop videos from further circulation via filesharing, chatrooms, and porn streaming sites.

Park Soo-yeon is an advocate who founded Digital Sex Crime Out, the organization that toppled Soranet.

Speaking of the national epidemic of crimes, Ms. Park said, “Digital sex crimes are not just a problem in Korea. There have been cases in Sweden and in the United States. But South Korea is so advanced technologically, with the fastest and most accessible internet in the world.”

South Korea is actually the world leader in smartphone owners and Internet usage with 90% and 93% of adults having access to both technologies.

Authorities continue to struggle to find cameras and identify perpetrators (who have the ability to change Internet addresses or stream overseas to evade capture).

Many have also expressed that punishment for spy cam porn is not harsh enough with convicted offenders only being faced with a single year of prison or a 10 million won fine ($8,902).

Moreover, many of these sex criminals evade consequences. According to the BBC, “Of the 6,465 cases  reported last year, 5,437 people were taken into custody. But only 119 of those went to prison. That’s just 2% of those caught.”

Many protestors have taken to the streets to vent their rage, with a chorus of women chanting, “My life is not your porn,” rallying four times this year already.

Via BBC 

 

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