Kris Wu's New Noodle Song Has Everyone Hungry For A Bowl | AsianCrush
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Kris Wu’s New Noodle Song Has Everyone Hungry For A Bowl

Otter Lee April 29, 2019 April 29th, 2019

Two years ago, Chinese-Canadian rapper, singer, and songwriter Kris Wu performed a rap in a noodle shop for customers for a reality show appearance. It went viral in a bad way and was widely used as a reason to diss and mock him. The freestyle lyrics “Look at the noodle, it’s long and thick — just like the bowl, which is big and round” were especially ridiculed.

The 28-year-old celebrity is well-acquainted with both fame and controversy. He recently starred in 2017’s XXX: Return of Xander Cage and was once signed with the South Korean boy band EXO and SM Entertainment. He eventually broke away from SM in a highly public legal dispute.

Flash forward to 2019 and Wu is taking the noodles back into his own hands. His new single “Big Bowl Thick Noodle” lampshades the original snippet, but goes further and turns it into a revitalized work of art and culinary passion.

Big Bowl calls for haters and fighters to set aside their insecurities and fears in favor of slurping noodles and relaxing.  Its debut video also features an adorable animated warrior Wu as he travels the world, fighting monsters, and enjoying the many ingredients of a good noodle soup!

Rather than trying to fight head on with his critics, Wu opted to find a more positive spin, and it may actually be helping noodle businesses around China too.

 

Restauranteurs and food delivery apps report that Wu’s work may have resulted in an influx of noodle orders. Chinese food-delivery app Ele.me says it had over 90,000 orders for bowls of noodles after the single dropped. Over 4,000 of the customers directly referenced Wu in some way with their orders, either through his viral catchphrase “skr” or simply the note “Sorry Kris.”

Fellow rapper After Journey claims that the song made him have a craving for noodles, but when he tried to call in an order, he found himself at the back of a 60-person queue.

Via Sixthtone